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Chromatographia

, Volume 48, Issue 3–4, pp 293–298 | Cite as

Separation of polychlorinated biphenyls from chlorinated pesticides using aminopropyl bonded-phase cartridge and determination by GC-ECD

  • M. V. Russo
  • G. Goretti
  • T. Nevigato
Originals

Summary

Gas chromatography of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides in water samples is carried out after adsorption from a 25–500 mL sample, on a cartridge containing 100 mg aminopropyl-bonded porous silica. The clean-up step in which the PCBs and chlorinated pesticides are separated in different eluates is achieved by passing 25 mL of 40% aqueous methanol through the NH2 Sep-Pak cartridge. The PCBs are desorbed with 500 μL ethylacetate, which is concentrated and analysis by GC-ECD. The average recovery, at 1 ppb is >97% with a standard deviation <2. The limits of detection are 0.1 ng μL−1 and 5 pg μL−1 respectively for Cl3-PCB and Cl8-PCB congeners. In the separation of PCBs from the chlorinated pesticides tested in this work, only the Aldrin is adsorbed for 60% with the PCBs by the NH2 Sep-Pak cartridge. The method described is rapid, simple and reproducible.

Key Words

Gas chromatography Solid phase extraction Polychlorobiphenyls Clorinated pesticides Organochlorine separation 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. V. Russo
    • 1
  • G. Goretti
    • 1
  • T. Nevigato
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di ChimicaUniversità “La Sapienza” RomaRomeItaly

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