Effect of the height of a melted layer on its thermal structure in growing single crystals by the stockbarger method with the use of the accelerated crucible rotation technique

  • V. É. Distanov
  • A. G. Kirdyashkin
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Abstract

The effect of the height of a melted layer on its thermal structure is examined. The maximum velocities of ascending and descending flows during crystal growth by the Stockbarger method with the use of the accelerated crucible rotation technique in crucibles100 mm in diameter at Taylor numbersTa>10 8 are estimated. A sudden increase in the amplitude of temperature oscillations with diminution of the height of the melted layer caused by unsteady rotation of the crucible is found. With decreasing height of the melted layer, the velocity of both ascending and descending flows at the axis of a cylindrical ampoule decreases.

Keywords

Thermal Structure Temperature Oscillation Crystallization Front Taylor Number Model Liquid 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishing 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. É. Distanov
  • A. G. Kirdyashkin

There are no affiliations available

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