Research in Science Education

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 43–55 | Cite as

Boundaries and selves in the making of ‘science’

  • Margaret Eisenhart
Article

Abstract

Relying on ideas from practice theory and critical autobiography, I use this article first to tell, and then to analyse, a story about trying to publish a book whose contents are in some ways marginal to what is normally considered science or science education. During the publishing process, what counts as science got tangled up with what counts as “credible” science, “marketable” literature, and academic competence. As a result, a book and a person (me) dedicated to expanding the boundaries of science also became contributors to those very same boundaries.

Keywords

Educational Researcher Practice Theory Science Education Reform York Time Book Review Abortion Group 

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Copyright information

© Australasian Science Education Research Association 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Eisenhart
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado, BoulderColoradoUSA

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