Mycoscience

, 37:25 | Cite as

Biological species ofArmillaria and their mycoparasitic associations withRhodophyllus abortivus in Hokkaido

  • Joo Young Cha
  • Tsuneo Igarashi
Original Papers

Abstract

Specimens of basidiomes and/or rhizomorphs ofArmillaria mellea complex and basidiomes ofRhodophyllus abortivus, developing on the same decaying stumps or stems of forest trees, were collected in three forests in Hokkaido. Normal basidiomes ofR. abortivus were found near to, but free from, the rhizomorphs and/or basidiomes ofArmillaria, while abnormal basidiomes, as carpophoroid forms, were developed on the rhizomorphs ofArmillaria. Of three mycoparasiticArmillaria isolates found withR. abortivus, one was identified asA. gallica and two asA. jezoensis. The isolates ofR. abortivus showed excellent mycelial growth and rhizomorph formation on PDA. However, on MDA, RMDA and BMDA, they showed poor aerial mycelia growth and no rhizomorphs. In the contrapositional cultures, the growth ofA. gallica was completely inhibited byR. abortivus on PDA but only slightly inhibited on MDA and RMDA. On the other hand, mutual inhibition at a distance was observed on BMDA. The mycelial growth and rhizomorph formation inA. jezoensis were severely inhibited by the colony ofR. abortivus on PDA, but only slightly inhibited on MDA. On RMDA and BMDA, the colonies of twoArmillaria species andR. abortivus showed mutual inhibition at a distance and apparent rhizomorph formation by bothArmillaria species.

Key Words

agaricoid form Armillaria gallica Armillaria jezoensis carpophoroid form Rhodophyllus abortivus 

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Copyright information

© The Mycological Society of Japan 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joo Young Cha
    • 1
  • Tsuneo Igarashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest Science, Faculty of AgricultureHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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