Follistatin inhibits the mesoderm-inducing activity of activin A and the vegetalizing factor from chicken embryo

  • Makoto Asashima
  • Hiroshi Nakano
  • Hideho Uchiyama
  • Hiromu Sugino
  • Takanori Nakamura
  • Yuzuru Eto
  • Daisuke Ejima
  • Michael Davids
  • Sigrun Plessow
  • Ivona Cichocka
  • Kei Kinoshita
Original Articles

Summary

The induction of mesoderm is an important process in early amphibian development. In recent studies, activin has become an effective candidate for a natural mesoderm-inducing factor. In the present study, we show that follistatin, an activin-binding protein purified from porcine ovary, inhibits the mesoderm-inducing activity of recombinant human activin A (rh activin A), which is identical to the erythroid differentiation factor (EDF). The quantity of follistatin required for effective suppression of activin was more than three-fold that of activin (w:w). Follistatin also inhibited the mesoderm-inducing activity of the vegetalizing factor purified from chick embryos, suggesting that the vegetalizing factor is closely related to activin.

Key words

Mesoderm induction Activin Vegetalizing factor Xenopus Follistatin FSH 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Asashima
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Nakano
    • 1
  • Hideho Uchiyama
    • 1
  • Hiromu Sugino
    • 2
  • Takanori Nakamura
    • 2
  • Yuzuru Eto
    • 3
  • Daisuke Ejima
    • 3
  • Michael Davids
    • 4
  • Sigrun Plessow
    • 4
  • Ivona Cichocka
    • 4
  • Kei Kinoshita
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of BiologyYokohama City UniversityKanazawa, YokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Frontier Research ProgramInstitute of Physical and Chemical Research (Riken)Wako, SaitamaJapan
  3. 3.Central Research LaboratoriesAjinomoto Co. Inc.Kawasaki, KawasakiJapan
  4. 4.Institut für Molekularbiologic und Biochemie der Freien Universität BerlinBerlin 33Federal Republic of Germany
  5. 5.Biological LaboratoryNippon Medical SchoolNakahara, KawasakiJapan

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