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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 122, Issue 3, pp 950–952 | Cite as

Determination of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate in human lymphocytes is a potential laboratory test in diabetology

  • N. F. Belyaeva
  • M. A. Golubev
  • M. S. Markova
  • O. L. Kol'chenko
  • N. N. Lamzina
  • V. K. Gorodetskii
  • L. N. Viktorova
  • M. I. Balabolkin
  • B. F. Korovkin
Experimental Methods for Clinical Practice

Abstract

The conventional micromethod of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P2) determination is optimized for human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The F-2,6-P2 content in lymphocytes of healthy subjects is 0.8±0.2 pmol/106 cells or 6.7±1.1 pmol/mg protein. Preliminary findings show a decrease in the F-2,6-P2 content in lymphocytes from patients with severe diabetes mellitus.

Key Words

fructose 2,6-bisphosphate lymphocytes peripheral blood 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. F. Belyaeva
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. A. Golubev
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. S. Markova
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. L. Kol'chenko
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. N. Lamzina
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. K. Gorodetskii
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. N. Viktorova
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. I. Balabolkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. F. Korovkin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Enzymology of Extreme States, Institute of Biomedical ChemistryRussian Academy of Medical SciencesMoscow
  2. 2.Institute of Diabetes, Endocrinology Research CenterRussian Academy of Medical SciencesMoscow

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