Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 120, Issue 5, pp 1087–1090 | Cite as

Effects of L-arginine and of its functional antagonist N-nitro-L-arginine on the behavior of rats, with special reference to motor activity

  • V. A. Dubynin
  • S. S. Fedyushina
  • S. N. Stryukov
  • K. V. Savel'eva
  • A. A. Kamenskii
  • I. P. Ashmarin
Physiology
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

L-arginine and N-nitro-L-arginine were tested for their effects on the motor activity of white rats under conditions of free behavior. After oral administration of L-arginine in doses of 50 to 500 mg/kg, the horizontal and vertical components of motor activity were increased both at minute 10 and at 24 h postadministration. N-nitro-L-arginine, on the contrary, reduced the motor activity of rats (mainly its horizontal component). Oral administration of L-arginine 5 min after an intraperitoneal injection of N-nitro-L-arginine did not prevent the effects of the latter compound. The observed behavioral changes probably resulted from the combined action of two mechanisms, namely a direct influence of nitric oxide on brain cells and its action on peripheral systems of the body.

Key Words

arginine arginine analogs nitric oxide locomotor activity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Dubynin
    • 1
  • S. S. Fedyushina
    • 1
  • S. N. Stryukov
    • 1
  • K. V. Savel'eva
    • 1
  • A. A. Kamenskii
    • 1
  • I. P. Ashmarin
    • 1
  1. 1.Moscow State UniversityMoscowUSSR

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