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Transducer forin vivo measurement of the inner diameter of arteries in laboratory animals

  • E. J. van der Schee
  • J. V. de Bakker
  • A. W. Zwamborn
Article

Abstract

A transducer permitting the measurement of the instantaneous inner diameter of arteriesin vivo is presented. Instantaneous diameter is related to a potential difference induced in the secondary coil of a miniature transformer. A detailed description is given and the transducer's performance is evaluated. Variation in artery diameter of 0·005 mm can be detected. The maximum force exerted on the artery wall was found to be 4·5×10−2N leading to an estimated distortion error of less than 0·3% for diameters of about 7 mm. The error of the mean diameter measurementin vivo is about 2% in the range from 6 mm to 8 mm. The transducer has a limited range of linearity. Four different sizes cover the range from 3·5 mm to 10 mm. The transducer was successfully used in quantifying the effect of injected contrast media (in dogs).

Keywords

Arteries Inner artery diameter Diameter transducer In vivo measurements 

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Copyright information

© IFMBE 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. J. van der Schee
    • 1
  • J. V. de Bakker
    • 1
  • A. W. Zwamborn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical TechnologyErasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands

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