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Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

, Volume 26, Issue 5, pp 516–522 | Cite as

Self-calibrating interference refractometer using a linear photodiode array for anaesthetic gas analysis

  • R. K. Jackson
  • E. Palayiwa
  • B. R. Sugg
  • C. E. W. Hahn
  • S. Weller
  • W. L. Davies
Instrumentation

Abstract

The laboratory standard for measurement of gas concentrations in binary mixtures is the manually operated interfence refractometer. We describe an automatic interference refractometer for theatre use incorporating a linear photodiode array and using digital electronics for signal analysis. The support system performs automatic self-calibration, samples gases from an anaesthetic machine, feeds them to the refractometer and presents information on gas concentrations and possible alarm conditions to the anaesthetist. The instrument may be incorporated into a new anaesthetic machine or may be an addition to an existing one. The instrument may also be applied in other fields where concentrations of known gases need to be monitored automatically.

Keywords

Anaesthetics Gas concentration Online gas analysis Refractometer 

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Copyright information

© IFMBE 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. K. Jackson
    • 1
  • E. Palayiwa
    • 2
  • B. R. Sugg
    • 3
  • C. E. W. Hahn
    • 2
  • S. Weller
    • 4
  • W. L. Davies
    • 1
  1. 1.Oxford Medical Ltd.Abingdon, OxonUK
  2. 2.Nuffield Department of AnaestheticsJohn Radcliffe HospitalOxfordUK
  3. 3.Penlon Ltd.Abingdon, OxonUK
  4. 4.Marconi Space SystemsPortsmouth, Hants.UK

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