Precise recording of eye movement: the IRIS technique Part 1

  • J. P. H. Reulen
  • J. T. Marcus
  • D. Koops
  • F. R. de Vries
  • G. Tiesinga
  • K. Boshuizen
  • J. E. Bos
Physiological Measurement

Abstract

The paper describes a newly developed method, called IRIS, for the precise measurement of horizontal and vertical eye movements. The method is based on the principle of reflection of infra-red light by the iris/sclera boundary. IRIS combines, when the frequency bandwidth is from DC to 100 Hz, a dynamic measuring range of 30° with a low noise level of 1 min of arc. The installation and application procedure of IRIS, without the need for rigid head fixation, is not complicated and does not require skilled personnel. IRIS allows for simultaneous recordings of the conjugate and disjunctive movements of both eyes, with a linear range up to 25° horizontal and 20° vertical.

Keywords

Eye movements Infra-red light Light reflex Pupil Recording Reflection 

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Copyright information

© IFMBE 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. H. Reulen
    • 1
  • J. T. Marcus
    • 1
  • D. Koops
    • 2
  • F. R. de Vries
    • 1
  • G. Tiesinga
    • 3
  • K. Boshuizen
    • 2
  • J. E. Bos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of MedicineFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Instrumental Department, Academic HospitalFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Ophthalmology, Academic HospitalFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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