Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 612–616 | Cite as

Computerised visual field test for children using multiple moving fixation targets

  • S. C. Johnston
  • B. E. Damato
  • A. L. Evans
  • D. Allan
Physiological Measurement

Abstract

A new method of testing the visual field in children has been developed on a standard IBM personal computer AT with enhanced graphics display (EGA) using software written in Basic. Conventional perimetric methods are usually imposible to perform in children because they are long and tedious and unlikely to maintain the child's attention for their duration. They also require an immobile eye, which is impractical in children. In contrast to current methods, the test allows the subject's eye to move in an effort to achieve improved fixation and uses the guise of a game to hold the child's attention. Preliminary studies show that the test achieves these objectives and offers the possibility of self-examination without constant skilled supervision. The relatively low cost of the system should enable visual field examination to become more widely available than it is at present.

Keywords

Children Computerised perimetry Moving fixation 

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Copyright information

© IFMBE 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Johnston
    • 1
  • B. E. Damato
    • 2
  • A. L. Evans
    • 2
  • D. Allan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Physica & Bio-EngineeringWest of Scotland Health BoardsGlasgowUK
  2. 2.Tennent Institute of OphthalmologyWestern InfirmaryGlasgowUK

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