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Streptococcal IgG Fc-binding proteins are factors initiating experimental glomerulonephritis

  • L. A. Burova
  • V. A. Nagornev
  • P. V. Pigarevskii
  • M. M. Gladilina
  • I. V. Molchanova
  • V. G. Seliverstova
  • A. Tern
  • G. Lindahl
  • A. A. Totolyan
Microbiology and Immunology

Abstract

Immunomorphological analysis of renal tissue from rabbits immunized with group A streptococci differing in the expression of IgG Fc-binding proteins showed that only IgG Fc-positive streptococci induced destructive degenerative changes in the kidneys classified as membranous proliferative glomerulonephritis with symptoms of fibroplastic glomerulonephritis. These morphological changes in renal tissue are comparable to changes in patients with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Depositions of IgG and C3 complement component on the basal membrane of renal glomeruli and secretion of antiinflammatory cytokines IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α by mesangial cells were revealed. No destructive changes were found in the kidneys of rabbits immunized with IgG Fc-negative streptococcus strain or isogenic mutant completely devoid of genes responsible for the expression of IgG Fc-binding proteins. Thus streptococcal IgG Fc-binding proteins determine the development of experimental glomerulonephritis in rabbits.

Key words

group A streptococci IgG Fc-receptors isogenic mutant anti-IgG experimental glomerulonephritis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Burova
    • 1
  • V. A. Nagornev
    • 1
  • P. V. Pigarevskii
    • 1
  • M. M. Gladilina
    • 1
  • I. V. Molchanova
    • 1
  • V. G. Seliverstova
    • 1
  • A. Tern
    • 2
  • G. Lindahl
    • 2
  • A. A. Totolyan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental MedicineRussian Academy of Medical Sciences, St.Petersburg
  2. 2.Department of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of LundLundSweden

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