European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 145, Issue 6, pp 532–538 | Cite as

Ultrasound: A method for kidney size monitoring in children

  • C. Christophe
  • F. Cantraine
  • C. Bogaert
  • C. Coussement
  • S. Hanquinet
  • M. Spehl
  • N. Perlmutter
Original Investigations

Abstract

Normal kidneys were studied echographically in 170 children from 0–15 years of age. The length, thickness, width, volume and largest sagittal and transverse areas were measured and plotted against the children's height and body surface to establish standard growth curves.

The usefulness of this non-invasive inter-and intra-individual estimation of renal size in following the progress of kidney alteration in children was illustrated in one case of malakoplakia and one case of parenchymal scars.

Key words

Kidney (growth and development) Ultrasonics Children Malakoplakia Pyelonephritis 

Abbreviation

L.1-L.3

size of the body of lumbar vertebrae one to three

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Christophe
    • 1
  • F. Cantraine
    • 2
  • C. Bogaert
    • 1
  • C. Coussement
    • 1
  • S. Hanquinet
    • 1
  • M. Spehl
    • 1
  • N. Perlmutter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyHôpital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Free University of BrusselsBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Computer DepartmentMedical School of the Free University of BrusselsBrusselsBelgium

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