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Cohort size and earnings in Great Britain

Abstract

Numerous studies in the United States have confirmed that individuals born into large cohorts, ceteris paribus, tend to have lower earnings on entry into the labour force compared to individuals born into small cohorts. On the other hand, only limited attention has been directed towards exploring the relationship between cohort size and earnings in other nations. This paper examines empirically the relationship between cohort size and male earnings in Great Britain. The data used is a time-series of cross-sections (1973–1982) constructed from theGeneral Household Survey. Some support for the hypothesis that large cohorts have depressed earnings is found. However, this effect does not persist as the cohort ages.

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Wright, R.E. Cohort size and earnings in Great Britain. J Popul Econ 4, 295–305 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02426373

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02426373

Keywords

  • Labour Force
  • Large Cohort
  • Household Survey
  • Small Cohort
  • Limited Attention