Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 248, Issue 5, pp 573–582 | Cite as

Developmental and tissue-specific regulation of the gene for the wheat basic/leucine zipper protein HBP-1a(17) in transgenicArabidopsis plants

  • K. Mikami
  • M. Katsura
  • T. Ito
  • M. Iwabuchi
  • M. Katsura
  • T. Ito
  • K. Okada
  • M. Iwabuchi
  • K. Okada
  • Y. Shimura
Original Paper

Abstract

Wheat basic/leucine zipper protein HBP-1a(17) binds in vitro specifically to ACGT motif-containing cis-acting elements, such as the type I element of plant histone promoters and the G-box of hormone- and light-inducible promoters. To address the in vivo function of HBP-1a(17), we isolated and structurally analyzed theHBP-1a(17) gene and examined its expression in transgenicArabidopsis plants. TheHBP-1a(17) gene is composed of 14 exons; the basic region and leucine zipper are encoded by separate small exons, as is the case for other bZIP protein genes. The G-box of theHBP-1a(17) promoter bound specifically to HBP-1a(17) and its related HBP-1a isoforms, suggesting that theHBP-1a(17) gene may be autoregulated, although the binding affinity of these proteins in vitro is very low. InArabidopsis plants, activation of theHBP-1a(17) promoter was highly restricted to photosynthetically active mesophyll, and guard cells and vascular bundles of vegetative leaves. Etiolation of transgenic plants resulted in inhibition of expression of theHBP-1a(17) promoter. Indeed, theHBP-1a(17) promoter contains several sequence elements homologous to cis-acting elements conserved in light-inducible promoters. It is, therefore, assumed that theHBP-1a(17) gene is light regulated and that HBP-1a(17) is involved in light-responsive gene transcription via the G-box.

Key words

Basic/leucine zipper protein HBP-1a(17) gene TransgenicArabidopsis Gene expression β-Glucuronidase 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Mikami
    • 1
  • M. Katsura
    • 1
  • T. Ito
    • 1
  • M. Iwabuchi
    • 1
  • M. Katsura
    • 2
  • T. Ito
    • 2
  • K. Okada
    • 2
  • M. Iwabuchi
    • 2
  • K. Okada
    • 3
  • Y. Shimura
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Developmental BiologyNational Institute for Basic BiologyOkazakiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Botony, Faculty of ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Gene Expression and Regulation INational Institute for Basic BiologyOkazakiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Biophysics, Faculty of ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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