Atomic Energy

, Volume 76, Issue 4, pp 258–265 | Cite as

Status of and possible approaches to the standardization of the safety of elements of the nuclear fuel cycle

  • O. M. Kovalevich
  • V. P. Slutsker
  • S. A. Kabakchi
  • G. M. Vladykov
  • B. G. Ryazanov
  • A. I. Kislov
Article

Conclusions

In summary, the foregoing analysis shows that the systems of standardizing documents for fuel-cycle elements must be developed as quickly as possible. The proposed system must have at the upper levels a hierarchical structure of documents of the regulating agencies and at the lower level it must contain the industry documents. Two principles must be observed: on the one hand, the requirements for the safety of the elements of the nuclear fuel cycle must be satisfied by approaches and principles corresponding to modern approaches to guaranteeing the safety of installations posing a nuclear and radiation hazard and, on the other, the extensive industrial experience accumulated and the corresponding industrial standardizing documentation should be used.

An important question in formulating such a system of requirements is: What are the further prospects for the development of the entire nuclear fuel cycle? If the future development of nuclear power in this country is based on a closed fuel cycle, then the entire infrastructure of the elements of the nuclear fuel cycle will have to be modified. The next century, when these enterprises will be operating, will have its own safety requirements, and we must think about this now. If the fuel cycle will be open and several of the presently operating elements of the fuel cycle survive, then we have a different formulation of the problem and different scientific and technical problems.

Keywords

Radiation Future Development Hierarchical Structure Regulate Agency Technical Problem 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. M. Kovalevich
  • V. P. Slutsker
  • S. A. Kabakchi
  • G. M. Vladykov
  • B. G. Ryazanov
  • A. I. Kislov

There are no affiliations available

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