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Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 97, Issue 1–2, pp 193–198 | Cite as

Mercury values in urine from inhabitants of St. Petersburg

  • S. E. Pogarev
  • V. V. Ryzhov
  • N. R. Mashyanov
  • M. B. Sobolev
Article

Abstract

The results of 3000 urine analyses are presented. The observational data were obtained for the reference group of school children and adults and for groups of people suffered from indoor mercury pollution. A novel Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer and cold vapour and piroliz methods were used for determination of total mercury. A background mercury value in urine for St. Petersburg region is determined as 0.5 μg/l. Distributions of mercury concentrations in urine after five accidents are given. There are considerable differences in total mercury distribution for each group, that depend on level of Hg exposure. Peculiar features of the 24-hour rhythm of mercury excretion with urine is used for the treatment of patients, an optimal therapy selection and rehabilitation control.

Keywords

Mercury School Child Mercury Concentration Peculiar Feature Total Mercury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. E. Pogarev
    • 1
  • V. V. Ryzhov
    • 1
  • N. R. Mashyanov
    • 1
  • M. B. Sobolev
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of the Earth CrustSt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.St. Petersburg Academy of PediatricsSt. PetersburgRussia

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