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Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 165–185 | Cite as

Mounting a community-based alcohol and drug abuse prevention effort in a multicultural urban setting: Challenges and lessons learned

  • Maryann Amodeo
  • Susan Wilson
  • Deborah Cox
Articles

Abstract

This article is designed to help planners and community groups anticipate challenges in implementing community based prevention programs in multicultural urban environments. Empowerment and public health goals are described as essential elements. Methods are recommended for capacity-building with inexperienced participants and balancing long and short term goals in embattled communities.

Key words

substance abuse prevention community-based 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maryann Amodeo
    • 1
  • Susan Wilson
  • Deborah Cox
  1. 1.School of Social WorkBoston UniversityBoston

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