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Environmental Management

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 531–548 | Cite as

Opportunities and constraints for development and conservation: Teller County/Woodland Park growth management plan

  • Larry Larsen
  • Terri Morrell
  • David Wood
  • Meghan Gallione
  • Bruce Guerard
  • Judith Karinen
  • Kip Petersen
  • Frederick Steiner
Research

Abstract

This is the second of three articles prepared to explain the Teller County growth management process. As part of an ongoing growth management process in Teller County, Colorado, opportunities and constraints for development and conservation were identified. The scenic mountain county faces a number of issues because of growth. The recognition of those issues has resulted in the goal to direct future growth to the most appropriate and cost-effective places. To determine those places that are best for new development, thorough ecological inventories were conducted for the entire county as well as for the City of Woodland Park area. From these inventories, environmentally sensitive areas were identified. The environmentally sensitive areas were considered constraints in conducting suitability analyses for a variety of potential land uses. The suitability analyses resulted in the identification of opportunities for future growth in Teller County generally as well as the more specific Woodland Park planning area. This article, like the other two, is part of a reflective analysis by the planners who were involved.

Key words

Landscape planning Ecological inventories Suitability analysis Environmentally sensitive areas 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Larsen
    • 1
  • Terri Morrell
    • 1
  • David Wood
    • 2
  • Meghan Gallione
    • 2
  • Bruce Guerard
    • 2
  • Judith Karinen
    • 2
  • Kip Petersen
    • 3
  • Frederick Steiner
    • 4
  1. 1.City of Woodland Park Planning DepartmentWoodland ParkUSA
  2. 2.Program in Urban and Regional Planning School of Architecture and PlanningUniversity of Colorado at DenverDenverUSA
  3. 3.Teller County Planning DepartmentWoodland ParkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Planning College of Architecture and Environmental DesignArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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