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Environmental Management

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 257–265 | Cite as

Development of an integrated environmental data base

  • H. J. O’Neill
  • R. A. Bingham
  • Geoffrey D. Howell
  • F. Colin Duerden
  • Christopher Roberts
Environmental Auditing

Abstract

The ability to access information for use in decision making is a well-recognized need within the context of management sciences. A similar need exists in order to make effective technical decisions pertaining to environmental resource management. Data bases are the principle vehicle by which scientists, engineers, and resource managers store and access environmental information. An integrated data-base mechanism is essential in order for federal agencies to manage programs such as enforcement of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), state of the environment (SOE) reporting, and the environmental assessment and review process (EARP). A data-base structure and data dissemination mechanism under current development within Environment Canada, Conservation and Protection, Atlantic Region, is presented along with some of its operational benefits and constraints.

Key words

Data bases GIS applications Data management 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. O’Neill
    • 1
  • R. A. Bingham
    • 1
  • Geoffrey D. Howell
    • 2
  • F. Colin Duerden
    • 3
  • Christopher Roberts
    • 3
  1. 1.Water Quality BranchEnvironment CanadaMonctonCanada
  2. 2.Water Planning and Management BranchEnvironment CanadaDartmouthCanada
  3. 3.Environmental ProtectionEnvironment CanadaDartmouthCanada

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