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Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 147–175 | Cite as

The Japanese historical experience—comparative and analytical dimensions

  • S. N. Eisenstadt
Article

Keywords

Social Psychology Social Issue Analytical Dimension Cross Cultural Psychology Historical Experience 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    E. Durkheim,Review of T. Fukuda, Die gesellschaftliche und wirtschaftliche Entwickelung in Japan, L'Annee Sociologique 5:342–347. For a very pertinent analysis of these developments among American and Japanese social scientists see T. Ishida and P. Steinhoff, Keynote Addresses inThe Postwar Development of Japanese Studies in the United States: A Historical Review and Prospects for the Future, International House of Japan 40th Anniversary Symposium, pp. 7–18 and 19–35 respectively, and also the panel discussion, pp. 36–58.Google Scholar
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    As we shall yet see in greater detail later on, a very interesting controversy—which sheds some very important light on some very central aspects of the distinctive aspects of Japanese institutional history and characteristics—developed among scholars with respect to the last, Tokugawa, stage of Japanese premodern society, as to whether it was a feudal or an absolutist era. See also I. Ryosuku, “Japanese Feudalism”,Acta Asiatica, 1975, v. 35, pp. 1–9; P. Duus,Feudalism in Japan, New York, A. A. Knopf, 1976, pp. 71–73; J. W. Hall, “Feudalism in Japan as Reassessment,” in op. cit., pp. 15–55; J. Arnason, “The Modern Constellation and the Japanese Enigma,”Thesis Eleven, N. 17, 1987, pp. 4–40.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. N. Eisenstadt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The Truman InstituteThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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