Advertisement

The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 207–212 | Cite as

Regional differences in glucose transport in the mouse hippocampus

  • Masahisa Shimada
  • Seiichi Kawamoto
  • Yayoi Hirose
  • Masatomo Nakanishi
  • Hirotoshi Watanabe
  • Masahito Watanabe
Papers

Summary

In order to observe glucose transport into the brain, 6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-6-deoxyglucose (NBDG), a non-metabolizable and fluorescent glucose analogue, was injected intravenously into mice. After ascertaining that this glucose analogue is non-metabolizable in the brain, the NBDG contents in the blood and brain were measured quantitatively by spectrofluorimetry at 0, 0.5, 2, 5, 10 and 30 min after intravenous injection. The NBDG content in the blood decreased markedly with time, whereas in the brain it rapidly decreased, then gradually increased after 2 min. Glucose transport into the hippocampus was observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. At 0.5 min, NBGD was seen to be highly concentrated on the vascular wall. Using the confocal mode, it was found that the fluorescence was unevenly distributed on the microvessel wall, suggesting local differences of glucose transport in the vascular wall. At 5 min, the fluoresent intensity of the vascular wall was markedly decreased, whereas relatively intense fluorescence was observed in the cerebral parenchyma of the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and stratum pyramidale of CA3. At 10 min, a weak fluoresence was diffusely distributed in the hippocampus. As to the localization of NBDG in the brain, capillary endothelium (luminal and abluminal membrane), basement membrane, and the feet of the astrocytes are discussed.

Keywords

Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Glucose Transport Confocal Laser Scanning Laser Scanning Microscope Vascular Wall 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Betz,A. L.,Goldstein,G. W. &Katzman,R. (1989) Blood-brain-cerebrospinal fluid barriers. InBasic Neurochemistry (edited bySiegel,G. J. et al.) pp. 591–606. New York: Raven Press.Google Scholar
  2. Blomquist,L. &Hanngren,A. (1966) Fluorescence technique applied to whole body sections for distribution studies of tetracyclines.Biochem. Pharmacol. 15, 215–9.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Boqust,L. (1989) Effects of sodium nitroprusside on blood glucose concentration, B-cell morphology and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity in mice.APMIS 97, 971–80.Google Scholar
  4. Caterson,I. D.,Williams,P. F.,Kerbey,A. L.,Astbury,L. D.,Plehwe,W. E. &Turtle,J. R. (1984) The effect of body weight and the fatty acid-oxidation inhibitor 2-tetradecyl-glycidic acid on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in the mouse heart.Biochem. J. 224, 787–91.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Clarke,D. D.,Lajtha,A. L. &Marker,H. S. (1989) Intermediary metabolism. InBasic Neurochemistry (edited bySiegel,G. J. et al.) pp. 541–64. New York: Raven Press.Google Scholar
  6. Farrel,C. L. &Pardridge,W. M. (1991) Blood-barrier glucose transporter is asymmetrically distributed on brain capillary endothelial lumenal and ablumenal membranes: an electron microscopic immunogold study.Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 5779–83.Google Scholar
  7. Johansen,F. F. &Diemer,N. H. (1986) Influence of the plasma glucose level on brain damage after systemic kainic acid injection in the rat.Acta. Neuropathol (Berl)71, 46–54.Google Scholar
  8. Lund-Andersen,H. (1979) Transport of glucose from blood to brain.Physiol. Rev. 59, 305–52.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Robinson,P. J. &Rapoport,S. I. (1986) Glucose transport and metabolism in the brain.Am. J. Physiol. 250, R127–36.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Shimada,M.,Shimoho,R. &Ozaki,H. S. (1989) Freeze-mount microautoradiographic study in the mouse hippocampus after intravenous injection of tritiated 2-deoxyglucose and glucose.Neurosc. 31, 347–354.Google Scholar
  11. Shimada,M.,Akagi,N.,Goto,H.,Watanabe,H.,Nakanishi,M.,Hirose,Y. &Watanabe,M. (1992) Microvessel and astroglial cell densities in the mouse hippocampus.J. Anatomy 180, 89–95.Google Scholar
  12. Siesjö,B. K. (1978) Utilization of substrates by brain tissues. InBrain Energy Metabolism (edited bySiesjö,B. K.) pp. 101–30. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  13. Speizer,L.,Haugland,R. &Kutchai,H. (1985) Asymmetric transport of a fluorescent glucose analogue by human erythrocytes.Biochim. Biophys. Acta 815, 75–84.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Watanabe,M.,Akagi,N.,Goto,H. &Shimada,M. (1989) Whole-body fluorography using black light fluorescent tubes.Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 22, 535–47.Google Scholar
  15. Zhang,Z. J.,Davidson,L.,Eisenbarth,G. &Weiner,H. L. (1991) Suppression of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by oral administration of porcine insulin.Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 88, 10252–56.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahisa Shimada
    • 1
  • Seiichi Kawamoto
    • 1
  • Yayoi Hirose
    • 1
  • Masatomo Nakanishi
    • 1
  • Hirotoshi Watanabe
    • 1
  • Masahito Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyOsaka Medical CollegeTakatsuki City, OsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations