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Cardiovascular and sympatho-adrenal responses to static handgrip performed with one and two hands

  • Ryszard Grucza
  • Jean-Francois Kahn
  • Gerard Cybulski
  • Wiktor Niewiadomski
  • Elżbieta Stupnicka
  • Krystyna Nazar
Article

Summary

12 healthy men aged 21–25 years performed, in the sitting position, a sustained handgrip at 25% of their maximum voluntary contraction, first with each hand separately and then with both hands simultanesouly. Heart are (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), stroke volume (determined reographically) and plasma catecholamine concentration were measured during each handgrip test. The HR and SBP increased consistently during each handgrip test while stroke volume decreased by approximately 20% of the initial value. Cardiac output did not change significantly. There were no significant differences in the magnitude and dynamics of the cardiovascular responses between the tests with one and with both hands. Plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels showed similar elevations in response to handgrip performed with the right hand and with both hands, while during the exercise performed with the left hand the increase in the plasma catecholamine concentration was less pronounced. It was concluded that: (1) during sustained handgrip, performed in the sitting position by young healthy subjects, the stroke volume markedly decreases and cardiac output does not change significantly in spite of the increased HR; (2) the cardiovascular and sympatho-adrenal responses to static handgrip do not depend on the mass of contracting muscle when the same relative tension is developed.

Key words

Static handgrip Stroke volume Cardiac output Blood pressure Plasma catecholamines 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryszard Grucza
    • 1
  • Jean-Francois Kahn
    • 2
  • Gerard Cybulski
    • 1
  • Wiktor Niewiadomski
    • 1
  • Elżbieta Stupnicka
    • 1
  • Krystyna Nazar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Physiology, Medical Research CentrePolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Physiologie du TravailCNRSParisFrance

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