New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment

  • S. F. Marsh
  • G. D. Jarvinen
  • R. A. Bartsch
  • J. Nam
  • M. E. Barr
Analytical and Separations Chemistry of Actinides

Abstract

Additional1 bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene ‘spacer’ between the two sites. Here we examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatieves with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

Keywords

Nitrogen Methylation Pyridine Nitric Acid Acid Solution 

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. F. Marsh
    • 1
  • G. D. Jarvinen
    • 1
  • R. A. Bartsch
    • 2
  • J. Nam
    • 2
  • M. E. Barr
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA

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