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Primates

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 285–288 | Cite as

Sons of low-ranking female rhesus macaques can attain high dominance rank in their natal groups

  • Joseph H. Manson
Short Communication

Abstract

Five adult and subadult sons of middle- and low-ranking female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were observed to hold high dominance rank in their natal groups during a 12-month study at Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico. Three of these males also experienced high mating success during at least one mating season. These findings contrast with all previously published accounts of rank acquisition by natal male rhesus macaques in provisioned colonies, and they present a challenge to the hypothesis that natal transfer functions to increase male access to fertile females.

Key Words

Macaca mulatta Dominance Dispersal Cayo Santiago 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph H. Manson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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