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Primates

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 266–272 | Cite as

Blood vitamin values of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

  • D. W. McNees
  • R. W. Lewis
  • B. J. Ponzio
  • F. J. Stein
  • R. F. Sis
  • B. M. Levy
Article

Abstract

The blood vitamin analyses of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) were determined to provide baseline reference values for the normal animal. Ascorbic acid, riboflavin (erythrocyte glutathione reductase) [ECR], measurement, thiamin (erythrocyte transketolase) measurement and vitamin A (retinol) were determined for Texas A&M colony-born animals and those obtained from the wild. The analyses were completed on the animals, three times each, for a total of 93 analyses, which included 51 colony-born and 60 wild-born marmosets. A mean value of 0.98 mg/dl for ascorbic acid was found for the colony with a range from 0.06 to 4.1 mg/dl. The normal range for the marmosets appeared to be 0.5 to 1.5 mg/dl. The mean activity coefficient (AC) for the marmosets was 1.0 indicating that the animals had adequate riboflavin in the diet. The mean transketolase activities were (ribose remaining −30.1 IU/L) and (sedoheptulose appearance −7.9 IU/L). The mean and range for serum vitamin A (retinol) were 20.4 mg/dl and 6.96–57.44 mg/dl, respectively. None of the animals (colony-born or wild-born) exhibited any clinical signs of vitamin deficiencies as a result of being maintained in an indoor-outdoor environment over a three-year period.

Keywords

Ascorbic Acid Thiamin Glutathione Reductase Riboflavin Activity Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. W. McNees
    • 1
  • R. W. Lewis
    • 1
  • B. J. Ponzio
    • 1
  • F. J. Stein
    • 2
  • R. F. Sis
    • 2
  • B. M. Levy
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, College of AgricultureTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of Veterinary AnatomyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas School of Dental ScienceHoustonUSA

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