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Primates

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 139–143 | Cite as

An apparatus and procedure for studying the choice component of foraging in a captive group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

  • Deborah A. Gust
  • R. Brent Swenson
  • Michael B. Smith
  • John Sikes
Short Communication

Abstract

An apparatus is described which was used to investigate the choice component of foraging in a captive group of chimpanzees maintained in a large, outdoor compound at the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center Field Station. The utilization of more than one apparatus would allow the investigation of other ecological and psychological concepts in nonhuman primates housed under semi-natural conditions.

Key Words

Chimpanzees Pan troglodytes Foraging Apparatus Choice 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah A. Gust
    • 1
  • R. Brent Swenson
    • 2
  • Michael B. Smith
    • 2
  • John Sikes
    • 2
  1. 1.Emory University and Georgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  2. 2.Yerkes Regional Primate Research CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaU.S.A.

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