Primates

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 117–127 | Cite as

Differentiation of mitochondrial DNA types inMacaca fascicularis

  • Shinji Harihara
  • Naruya Saitou
  • Momoki Hirai
  • Naomi Aoto
  • Keiji Terao
  • Fumiaki Cho
  • Shigeo Honjo
  • Keiichi Omoto
Article

Abstract

Restriction fragment length polymorphism in the mitochondrial DNA ofMacaca fascicularis from four geographical regions, Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indochina, was analyzed. In total, 21 types of mitochondrial DNA were detected using five restriction enzymes. These types were divided into two main groups based on phylogenetic analyses, one of which corresponded to the types of continental (Malaysia/Indochina) populations and the other to the types of a insular (Philippine) population. The types in the Indonesian population belonged to both groups. In the phylogenetic tree for the four populations, two clusters were constructed, one for the continental populations and the other for the insular ones.

Key Words

Macaca fascicularis Mitochondrial DNA type Genetic distance Phylogenetic tree Maximum parsimony method 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shinji Harihara
    • 1
  • Naruya Saitou
    • 1
  • Momoki Hirai
    • 1
  • Naomi Aoto
    • 1
  • Keiji Terao
    • 2
  • Fumiaki Cho
    • 2
  • Shigeo Honjo
    • 2
  • Keiichi Omoto
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, Faculty of ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.The Japanese Tsukuba Primate Centre for Medical ScienceNational Institute of HealthIbarakiJapan
  3. 3.Department of Anthropology, Faculty of ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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