Hydrotechnical Construction

, Volume 2, Issue 12, pp 1055–1059 | Cite as

Photoelasticity technique of analyzing heat-induced strain in concrete blocks used in hydraulic constructions

  • G. L. Khesin
  • B. B. Dolgopolov
  • V. N. Savost’yanov
Papers
  • 14 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    The effect of transverse crowding on the solution has been evaluated with the photoelasticity technique, for the two-dimensional problem of a block cooling (or heated) on a flat foundation. The error in the contact zone does not exceed 9–15%, respectively, for the elastic and perfectly rigid foundation.

     
  2. 2.

    Lateral surfaces of the heated blocks show tensile stresses of about\(0.5\tfrac{{E\alpha {\rm T}}}{{1 - \mu }}\), which may lead, in some instances, to an opening of the horizontal structural joints (sutures) or to the appearance of horizontal fractures.

     
  3. 3.

    A. correlation of stresses in a volume block with a square base with those in the corresponding block in plane deformation shows a fairly similar stress distribution in both. Strain components σx, σy, and τxy in the volume block are, respectively, 0.6–0.7, 0.5–0.6, and 0.30–0.35 of those for block in plane deformation. These figures, in conjunction with the available theoretical or experimental solutions for the plane problem, make it possible to evaluate approximately the effect of block volume on the magnitude of strain.

     

Keywords

Tensile Stress Renewable Energy Source Electrical Power Generation Strain Component Plane Deformation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    S. V. Aleksandrovskii, Calculation of Concrete and Reinforced-Concrete Structures for Temperature and Humidity Effect (accounting for creep) [in Russian], Stroiizdat (1966).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. S. Rozanov, “Model analysis of temperature stresses in cooled blocks,” Izv., VNIIG,73 (1963).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    I. A. Mikhailova, “Experimental studies of the ‘jamming coefficient’ for cooled-off blocks,” Sbornik Dokladov po Gidrotekhnike, No. 6, “Énergiya” (1965).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    G. S. Vardanyan and N. I. Prigorovskii, “Modeling of thermoelastic stresses in the polarization-optical technique,” Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Otd. Tekhn. Nauk, Mekhanika i Mashinostroenie, No. 4 (1962).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    G. L. Khesin, V. N. Savost’yanov, E. M. Shvei, and B. V. Bida, “Polarization-optical study of heat-induced stresses in floating block of Kislaya Guba Tidal Electric Power Plant,” Gidrotekh. Stroitel No. 11 (1966).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. L. Khesin and V. N. Savost’yanov, “Modeling of the thermoelastic problem for gravity dams with enlarged joints,” Gidrotekh. Stroitel, No. 6 (1967).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Parkes and Durelly, “Photoelastic analysis of slabs in constrained sagging,” Amer. Soc. of Mechanic. Engineers, Ser. E. Applied Mechanics [Russian translation], No. 3, “Mir” (1965).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© American Society of Civil Engineers 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Khesin
  • B. B. Dolgopolov
  • V. N. Savost’yanov

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations