Advertisement

Primates

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 574–579 | Cite as

Ecogeographic segregation of macaque species

  • Jack Fooden
Short Communications

Abstract

Sympatry in the genusMacaca is restricted to a heartland area in South Asia that is inhabited by eight species. All heartland species apparently are segregated either ecologically or geographically. Available evidence is compatible with the hypothesis that interspecific competition has been a major factor in the evolution of this pattern of ecogeographic segregation.

Keywords

Animal Ecology Interspecific Competition Macaque Species Heartland Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albrecht, G., 1978. The craniofacial morphology of the Sulawesi macaques: multivariate approaches to biological problems.Contr. Primatol., 13: 1–151.Google Scholar
  2. Bertrand, M., 1969.The Behavioral Repertoire of the Stumptail Macaque: A Descriptive and Comparative Study. Bibliotheca Primatologica, Vol. 11, S. Karger, Basel.Google Scholar
  3. Chivers, D. J., 1980. Introduction. In:Malayan Forest Primates: Ten Years Study in Tropical Rain Forest,D. J. Chivers (ed.), Plenum, New York, pp. 1–27.Google Scholar
  4. Crockett, C. M. &W. L. Wilson, 1980. The ecological separation ofMacaca nemestrina andM. fasciularis in Sumatra. In:The Macaques: Studies in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution,D. G. Lindburg (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 148–181.Google Scholar
  5. Delson, E., 1980. Fossil macaques, phyletic relationships and a scenario of deployment. In:The Macaques: Studies in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution,D. G. Lindburg (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 10–30.Google Scholar
  6. Eudey, A. A., 1980. Pleistocene glacial phenomena and the evolution of Asian macaques. In:The Macaques: Studies Ecology, Behavior and Evolution,D. G. Lindburg (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 52–83.Google Scholar
  7. Fiedler, W., 1956.Übersicht über das System der Primates. Primatologia, Vol. 1,H. Hofer, A. H. Schultz &D. Starck (eds.), S. Karger, Basel, pp. 1–266.Google Scholar
  8. Fooden, J., 1969.Taxonomy and Evolution of the Monkeys of Celebes (Primates: Cercopithecidae). Bibliotheca Primatologica, Vol. 10, S. Karger, Basel.Google Scholar
  9. ————, 1971.Report on Primates Collected in Western Thailand, January–April, 1967. Fieldiana, Zoology, Vol. 59, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.Google Scholar
  10. ----,Taxonomy and Evolution of Liontail and Pigtail Macaques (Primates: Cercopithecidae). Fieldiana, Zoology, Vol. 67, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.Google Scholar
  11. ————, 1979. Taxonomy and evolution of thesinica group of macaques: 1. Species and subspecies accounts ofMacaca sinica.Primates, 20: 109–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. ————, 1980. Classification and distribution of living macaques (Macaca Lacépède, 1799). In:The Macaques: Studies in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution,D. G. Lindburg (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 1–9.Google Scholar
  13. ————, 1981.Taxonomy and Evolution of the sinicaGroup of Macaques: 2. Species and Subspecies Accounts of the Indian Bonnet Macaque, Macaca radiata. Fieldiana, Zoology, New Series, No. 9, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.Google Scholar
  14. ————, 1982.Taxonomy and Evolution of the sinicaGroup of Macaques: 3. Species and Subspecies Accounts of Macaca assamensis. Fieldiana, Zoology, New Series, No. 10, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.Google Scholar
  15. ————, 1981. Redefinition of rhesus macaque-bonnet macaque boundary in peninsular India (Primates:Macaca mulatta, M. Radiata).J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 78: 463–474.Google Scholar
  16. Green, S., &K. Minkowski, 1977. The lion-tailed monkey and its South Indian rain forest habitat. In:Primate Conservation,Prince Rainier III &G. H. Bourne (eds.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 289–337.Google Scholar
  17. Groves, C. P., 1980. Speciation inMacaca: The view from Sulawesi. In:The Macaques: Studies in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution,D. G. Lindburg (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 84–124.Google Scholar
  18. Heck, Jr., K. L., 1980. Competitive exclusion or competitive delusion?Paleobiology, 6: 241–242.Google Scholar
  19. Huey, R. B., 1979. Parapatry and niche complementarity of Peruvian desert geckos (Phyllodactylus): The ambiguous role of competition.Oecologia (Berlin), 38: 249–259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Mc Cann, C. J., 1933. Notes on some Indian macaques.J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc., 36: 796–810.Google Scholar
  21. Pianka, E. R., 1974.Evolutionary Ecology. Harper & Row, New York.Google Scholar
  22. Richard, A. F. &S. J. Goldstein, 1981. Primates as weeds: The implications for macaque evolution.Amer. J. Phys. Anthropol., 54: 267.Google Scholar
  23. Rodman, P. S., 1973. Synecology of Bornean primates: I. A test for interspecific interactions in spatial distribution of five species.Amer. J. Phys. Anthropol., 38: 655–659.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Fooden
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Field Museum of Natural History and Chicago State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Division of MammalsField Museum of Natural HistoryChicagoU.S.A.

Personalised recommendations