Primates

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 505–516 | Cite as

A sequential analysis of female aggression in a group of lesser galagos (Galago senegalensis)

  • Fred B. Bercovitch
Article

Abstract

A sequential analysis of behaviors preceding agonistic interactions between female lesser galagos demonstrated that aggression usually follows locomotor or interactive, as opposed to solitary, behavior. Leaping or leaving a nest box followed by mutual staring is a frequent component preceding both chases and displacements. The probability of predicting an agonistic interaction is improved when more behaviors are examined in sequence, although one cannot predict aggression with certainty due to the variability of preceding sequences. Mutual staring is suggested to be an evolutionary precursor to elaborate visual threat signals.

Keywords

Sequential Analysis Frequent Component Animal Ecology Agonistic Interaction Threat Signal 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred B. Bercovitch
    • 1
  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityUSA

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