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Primates

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 493–503 | Cite as

Group formation in captive lesser galagos (Galago senegalensis)

  • Leanne T. Nash
  • Lynn Flinn
Article

Abstract

A group of captiveGalago senegalensis, two males and two females housed under semi-natural conditions, were observed throughout their active periods for 10 days. An additional 100 hours of observation was undertaken during a subsequent 25-day period. The course of group formation was similar to that reported forG. crassicaudatus but in contrast to reports for monkeys. Aggressive interactions occurred primarily between individuals of the same sex and friendly interactions occurred primarily between individuals of the opposite sex.

Keywords

Group Formation Animal Ecology Active Period Aggressive Interaction Friendly Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leanne T. Nash
    • 1
  • Lynn Flinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyArizona State UniversityTempeU.S.A.

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