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Plant and Soil

, Volume 69, Issue 3, pp 365–373 | Cite as

Studies on the efficacy of a phytohormone producing phosphate solubilizingBacillus firmus in augmenting paddy yield in acid soils of Nagaland

  • M. Datta
  • S. Banik
  • R. K. Gupta
Article

Summary

A super strain ofBacillus firmus (NCIM-2636) producing a phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid, in addition to its high ability to solubilize insoluble inorganic phosphates were applied in acid soils of Nagaland, India. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) variety Jaya and IR-8 were grown in kharif season in two successive years 1980 and 1981. After proper manuring the soils received single super phosphate (S.S.P.) and Mussoorie Rock phosphate (R.P.) separately at different doses. Yield of crop in both the years increased significantly due to bacterial inoculation. Maximum grain yield was recorded in Jaya variety under S.S.P. and R.P. when treatments were at the dose of 43.75 and 17.5 kg P ha−1 respectively while the same in IR-8 variety under S.S.P. and R.P. treatments were at the dose of 35 and 17.5 kg P ha−1 respectively. Maximum straw yield was produced by Jaya variety when 35 and 43.75 kg P ha−1 in the form of S.S.P. and R.P. respectively were applied. Highest straw yield of IR-8 variety was obtained after the application of 17.5 kg P ha−1 (S.S.P. and R.P.) in combination with phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Bacterial inoculation decreased the phosphorus availability in 1 st year but increased the same in 2nd year. Phosphorus content in grains was significantly enhanced in both the trials. Maximum uptake of phosphorus by grains was noted in Jaya variety at the dose of 47.5 kg P ha−1 and in IR-8 variety at the dose of 52.5 kg P ha−1 under S.S.P. treatment, while 8.75 and 35 kg P ha−1 in the form of R.P. yielded similar results in Jaya and IR-8 varieties respectively. Phosphorus at the dose of 35 kg ha−1 was found to cause more P-uptake by straw in both S.S.P. and R.P. treatments. The various data from the experiment conclusively proved that the bacterium in combination with R.P. produced the desired effect more prominently than when bacterium applied in combination with S.S.P.

Key words

Available phosphorus Bacillus firmus Grain yield Phosphate Oryza sativa L. Phytohormone producer Rice Solubilizer of phosphate 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Datta
    • 1
  • S. Banik
    • 1
  • R. K. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.ICAR Research Complex for North-Eastern Hills Region NagalandMedziphemaIndia

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