Plant and Soil

, Volume 103, Issue 1, pp 111–121 | Cite as

Cultivar and Rhizobium strain effect on nitrogen fixation and transport inPhaseolus vulgaris L.

  • Mariangela Hungria
  • Maria C. P. Neves
Article

Abstract

The effects of Rhizobium strain and its interaction with plant cultivar were examined in glasshouse-grownPhaseolus vulgaris in two experiments where the physiological attributes defining the symbiotic efficiency were determined.

Strains of Rhizobium significantly affected nodulation, rates of N accumulation, partitioning of N within the mature shoot and remobilizaton of the N stored in the vegetative organs to the seeds.

The most efficient symbiosis (strain CO5 with Negro Argel), in comparison with the least efficient symbiosis (strain 127 K-17 with Venezuela-350) showed higher rates of C2H2 reduction from flowering to mid pod fill stage, evolved less hydrogen from nodules and showed higher rates of N transport as well as higher percentages of ureide-N in the xylem sap. At maturity, the best cultivar/strain association exceeded the total N accumulated in the seed and the harvest index of the poorest symbiosis in 88% and 20%, respectively. The other symbiotic combinations were intermediate in all characteristics.

Nitrogen accumulation in plant shoot showed highly significant correlation with acetylene reduction rates, nodule relative efficiency, total N transport in the xylem sap and percentage of N transported as ureides.

Key words

dry beans harvest index hydrogen evolution nitrogenase rhizobium ureides 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariangela Hungria
    • 1
  • Maria C. P. Neves
    • 1
  1. 1.EMBRAPA-Programa Nacional de Pesquísa em Biologia do Solo Km47Rio de JameiroBrazil

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