Advertisement

Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 143–158 | Cite as

Electric and dielectric properties of wet human cancellous bone as a function of frequency

  • Subrata Saha
  • Paul Allen Williams
Article

Abstract

In this study the electrical and dielectric properties of wet human cancellous bone from distal tibiae were examined as a function of frequency and direction. The resistance and capacitance of the cancellous bone specimens were measured at near 100% relative humidity. The measurements were made in all three orthogonal directions at discrete frequencies ranging from 120 Hz to 10 MHz using an LCR meter. At a frequency of 100 kHz, the mean resistivity and specific capacitance for the thirty cancellous bone specimens were 500 ohm-cm and 8.64 pF/cm in the longitudinal direction, 613 ohm-cm and 15.25 pF/cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 609 ohm-cm and 14.64 pF/cm in the lateral-medial direction. All electrical and dielectric properties except the resistivity and the impedance were highly frequency dependent for the frequency range tested. All electrical and dielectric properties were transversely isotropic as the values for the longitudinal direction were different from values obtained for the two transverse directions and properties in the two transverse directions were approximately similar.

Keywords

Electrical properties Cancellous Bone Frequency dependence Resistance Capacitance 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Chakkalakal, D.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Harper, R.A.; Katz, J.L. Dielectric properties of fluid-saturated bone. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 27:95–100; 1980.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chakkalakal, D.A.; Johnson, M.W. Electrical properties of compact bone. Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res. 161:133–145; 1981.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chen, I.I.H.; Saha, S. Analysis of current distribution in bone produced by pulsed electro-magnetic field stimulation of bone. Biomat. Art. Cells Art. Org. 15:737–744; 1987–88.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Davies, R.J.; Renah, J.; Kaplan, D.; et al. Epithelial impedance analysis in experimentally induced colon cancer. Biophysical J. 52:783–790; 1987.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gong, J.K.; Arnold, J.S.; Cohn, S.H. Composition of trabecular and cortical bone. Anatomical Record. 149:325–332; 1964.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hancox, N.M. Biology of Bone. London: Cambridge University; 1972.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kosterich, J.D.; Foster, K.R.; Pollack, S.R. Dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of fluid saturated bone. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 30:81–86; 1983.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Kosterich, J.D.; Foster, K.R.; Pollack, S.R. Dielectric properties of fluid-saturated bone—the effect of variation in conductivity of immersion fluid. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 31:369–373; 1984.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lakes, R.S.; Harper, R.A.; Katz, J.L. Dielectric relaxation in cortical bone. J. Appl. Physics 48: 808–811; 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Liboff, A.R.; Rinaldi, R.A.; Lavine, L.S.; Shamos, M.H. On electrical conduction in living bone. Clin. Orthop. 106:330–335; 1975.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Martin, R.B. Comparison of capacitive and inductive bone stimulation devices. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 7:387–409; 1979.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Pethig, R. Dielectric properties of body tissues. Clin. Phys. Physiol. Meas. 8:5–12; 1987.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Pethig, R. Dielectric and Electronic Properties of Biological Materials, New York: John Wiley and Sons; 1979.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Pethig, R.; Kell, D.B. The passive electrical properties of biological systems: their significance in physiology, biophysics, and biotechnology (review article). Phys. Med. Biol. 32:933–970; 1987.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Rai, D.V.; Saha, S.; Williams, P.A.; Saha, K. Electrical properties of ligaments. Digest of Paperts, 6th Southern Biomed. Eng. Conf.: pp. 150–151; 1987.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Reddy, G.N.; Saha, S. Electrical and dielectric properties of wet bone as a function of frequency. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 31:296–302; 1984.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Saha, S.; Reddy, G.N.; Albright, J.A. Factors affecting the measurement of bone impedance. Med. Biol. Eng. and Comp. 22:123–129; 1984.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Saha, S.; Williams, P.A. Electrical properties of cancellous bone. Fed. Proc. 45:172; 1986.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Saha, S.; Williams, P.A. Electrical properties of human cancellous bone from distal femur. Trans. 12th Ann. Meet. Soc. Biomat. 9:80; 1986.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Saha, S.; Williams, P.A. Electrical and dielectric properties of wet human cancellous bone as a function of frequency. In: Saha, S., ed. Biomedical Engineering V: Recent Developments, New York: Pergamon Press; 1986: pp. 217–220.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Saha, S.; Williams, P.A. Effect of various storage methods on the dielectric properties of compact bone. Med. and Biol. Eng. and Comput. 26:199–202; 1988.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Schwan, H.P. Dielectric Properties of Cells and Tissues. In: Chiabrera, A.; Nicolini, C.; Schwan, H.P., eds. Interactions Between Electromagnetic Fields and Cells, New York: Plenum Press; 1985.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Singh, S.; Behari, J. Frequency dependence of electrical properties of human bone. J. Bioelectricity 3:347–356; 1984.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Singh, S.; Saha, S. Electrical properties of bone: a review. Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res. 186:249–271; 1984.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Smith, S.R.; Foster, K.R. Dielectric properties of low-water-content tissues. Phys. Med. Biol. 30: 965–973; 1985.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Stoy, R.D.; Foster, K.R.; Schwan, H.P. Dielectric properties of mammalian tissues from 0.1 to 100 MHz: a summary of recent data. Phys. Med. Biol. 27:501–513; 1985.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Swanson, G.T.; Lafferty, J.F. Electrical properties of bone as a function of age, immobilization, and vibration. J. Biomech. 5:261–266; 1972.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Yamamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Ohta, S.; et al. The measurement principle for evaluating the performance of drugs and cosmetics by skin impedance. Med. and Biol. Eng. and Comp. 16:623–632; 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Pergamon Press plc 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Subrata Saha
    • 1
  • Paul Allen Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryLouisiana State University Medical CenterShreveport

Personalised recommendations