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Biological effects of non-ionizing radiations: Cellular properties and interactions

Abstract

The Lauriston Taylor lectures honor the founder of the National Committee on Radiation Protection and Measurement soon to be followed by the corresponding international organization. These standard setting bodies had a vast influence on proper recognition of radiation hazards. The 10th Taylor lecture is the first to deal with nonionizing radiations and may be, therefore, of particular interest to the bioengineer. During early history biophysics and bioengineering were primarily concerned with ionizing radiation bioeffects and electrophysiology. The nonionizing part of the radiation field and electrophysiology are closely related. Biomedical observation, biophysical and bioengineering efforts in the nonionizing radiation field are defined and complement each other. Topics concentrate on the relevant biophysical and bioengineering efforts of the author and his colleagues. They include: electrical properties of biological systems; established electrical field interactions (excitation, macromolecular responses and cellular responses); problems of dosimetry (macroscopic and microscopic considerations); conclusions about relative merits of various research approaches.

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Correspondence to Herman P. Schwan.

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Editor’s Note: By special permission from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda, MD, 20814, Mr. W. Roger Ney, Executive Secretary. Presented April 2, 1986 in the Auditorium of the National Academy of Sciences Building, Washington, DC.

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Schwan, H.P. Biological effects of non-ionizing radiations: Cellular properties and interactions. Ann Biomed Eng 16, 245–263 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02368002

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Keywords

  • Radiation Field
  • Standard Setting
  • Research Approach
  • National Committee
  • Radiation Protection