Potato Research

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 669–674 | Cite as

Quantitative assessment of tuber contamination by pectolytic erwinia and its possible use in the prediction and control of blackleg

  • K. Robinson
  • G. Foster
Short Communication

Summary

A Most Probable Number Technique based on the use of carbohydrate-free McConkey broth and crystal violet pectate agar for the quantification of tuber-borne pectolytic erwinia has been developed. The population of the organisms on naturally contaminated tubers has been shown to be log-normally distributed. The possibility of using tuber contamination and standards for tuber quality for the prediction and control of blackleg is explored.

Additional keywords

sampling presumptive count enrichment medium standards 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Robinson
    • 1
  • G. Foster
    • 1
  1. 1.Bacteriology DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenScotland

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