Day Care and Early Education

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 26–29 | Cite as

Always growing and learning: A case for self-assessment

  • Nancy Baptiste
Columns Professional Development

Conclusion

In conclusion, the entire self-assessment process is dynamic and ongoing. It is challenging and time-consuming, yet most gratifying as educators develop enhanced self-understanding and self-knowledge. The self-assessment process simultaneously enables teachers to touch reality (present focus) as well as to dream (future focus). The self-assessment process allows teachers to take care of themselves. Although the incoming president of the NAEYC appropriately urged participants in the 1994 Professional Development Institute “to look out for each other, take care of each other” (Daniels, 1994), it behooves each one of us to make sure that we take care of ourselves as well. This advice is not intended to be a call for self-centeredness; we do a much better job in our own work with others when we have taken care of ourselves. Continuous personal and professional self-assessment provides that opportunity to take care of ourselves. The kind of renewal that self-assessment provides is “preserving and enhancing the greatest asset you have—you” (Covey, 1989, p. 288).

Keywords

Professional Development Development Institute Great Asset Present Focus Future Focus 

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References

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Selected Resources for Personal and Professional Self-Assessment Activities

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  6. Seaver, J.W., Cartwright, C.A. Ward C.B. & Heasley, C.A. (1984).Careers with young children: Making your decision. Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of Young Children.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Baptiste
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Education, Department 3 CURNew Mexico State UniversityLas Cruces

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