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Behavior Genetics

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 1–5 | Cite as

Hippocampal morphology in the inbred mouse strains NZB and CBA/H and their reciprocal congenics for the nonpseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome

  • Pascale-Valérie Guillot
  • Frans Sluyter
  • Abdelkader Laghmouch
  • Pierre L. Roubertoux
  • Wim E. Crusio
Article

Abstract

The effects of the nonpseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome (Y NPAR ) on hippocampal morphology have been investigated in the inbred mouse strains NZB/B1NJ and CBA/H, using comparisons between the two parentals and their respective congenics N.H-Y NPAR and H.N-Y NPAR . Results obtained depend upon the hippocampal variable measured. Y NPAR had no effect on the sizes of the stratum oriens, hilus, or mossy fiber terminal fields (both suprapyramidal and intra- and infrapyramidal). However, in interaction with the strain background, it affected the strata lacunosum-moleculare, radiatum, and pyramidale. Possible relationships among gene(s), mossy fiber terminal fields, and intermale aggression are discussed.

Key Words

Intermale aggression congenic strains hippocampus mossy fibers NZB/B1NJ CBA/H Y chromosome 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pascale-Valérie Guillot
    • 1
  • Frans Sluyter
    • 1
  • Abdelkader Laghmouch
    • 1
  • Pierre L. Roubertoux
    • 1
  • Wim E. Crusio
    • 1
  1. 1.Génetique, Neurogénétique et Comportement, URA 1294 CNRSUniversité Paris V-René Descartes, UFR BiomédicaleParis Cedex 06France

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