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Potato Research

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 17–28 | Cite as

Comparison of the effect of storage environment on tuber contamination withErwinia carotovora

  • R. T. Pringle
  • K. Robinson
  • S. Wale
  • G. Burnett
Article

Summary

One tonne boxes of seed potatoes cv. Désirée contaminated withErwinia carotovora were held in four different types of farm stores. In general, contamination fell rapidly immediately after harvest and rose later in the storage season. The extent of these changes varied considerably with store type. The greatest reduction was from a log count of 5.5 to 2.1 after one month storage, followed by a rise to 5.1 prior to planting. No relationship was found between store temperature, relative humidity and change in contamination. There was some evidence that reduction in contamination was related to duration of ventilation, and rise in contamination to onset of sprouting. A sample held at a constant 4°C showed little reduction in contamination, and no rise occurred later in the storage season.

Additional key words

Erwinia carotovora storage conditions tuber contamination 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. T. Pringle
    • 1
  • K. Robinson
    • 1
  • S. Wale
    • 1
  • G. Burnett
    • 1
  1. 1.North of Scotland College of AgricultureAberdeenScotland

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