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Research in Science Education

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 19–32 | Cite as

Toward a critical approach to the study of learning environments in science classrooms

  • Anthony Lorsbach
  • Kenneth Tobin
Article

Abstract

Traditional learning environment research in science classrooms has been built on survey methods meant to measure students' and teachers' perceptions of variables used to define the learning environment. This research has led mainly to descriptions of learning environments. We argue that learning environment research should play a transformative role in science classrooms; that learning environment research should take into account contemporary post-positivist ways of thinking about learning and teaching to assist students and teachers to construct a more emancipatory learning environment. In particular, we argue that a critical perspective could lead to research playing a larger role in the transformation of science classroom learning environments. This argument is supplemented with an example from a middle school science classroom.

Keywords

Learning Environment Middle School Environment Research School Science Science Classroom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Australasian Science Education Research Association 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Education and Institute for Science EducationUniversity of Alabama in HuntsvilleHuntsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Florida State UniversityUSA

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