Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 341–352 | Cite as

Tri-ethnic alcohol use and religion, family, and gender

  • Norma Haston Turner
  • Gina Yvonne Ramirez
  • John C. Higginbotham
  • Kyriakos Markides
  • Alice C. Wygant
  • Sandra Black
Article

Abstract

Nine different behavioral responses to alcohol by over two hundred ninth-graders in Austin, Texas, were examined in a survey designed to identify the relationship between adolescents' alcohol use, religious affiliation, religiosity, and gender. The relationship between alcohol use and family adaptability was also examined. While religious affiliation was found to be mildly predictive of use, religiosity determined only specific behavior. Gender differences in alcohol use appeared to be narrowing. Family adaptability was the most predictive variable, showing a relationship with six of the nine kinds of alcohol behavior. Future studies of family influences on adolescents' alcohol behavior and alcohol use among females are recommended.

Keywords

Alcohol Future Study Gender Difference Predictive Variable Behavioral Response 

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Copyright information

© Institutes of Religion and Health 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norma Haston Turner
    • 1
  • Gina Yvonne Ramirez
    • 2
  • John C. Higginbotham
    • 2
  • Kyriakos Markides
    • 3
  • Alice C. Wygant
    • 4
  • Sandra Black
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Allied Health SciencesUniversity of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceUniversity of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston
  3. 3.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community HealthUniversity of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston
  4. 4.Alcohol and Drug Awareness ProgramUniversity of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston

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