Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 618–622 | Cite as

Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome in which venous hum disappeared following endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy

  • Osamu Yamakawa
  • Hideki Ohta
  • Hiroyuki Watanabe
  • Yoshiharu Motoo
  • Takashi Okai
  • Masumi Kadoya
  • Osamu Matsui
  • Norio Sawabu
Case Report
  • 41 Downloads

Abstract

We report a case of Cruveihier-Baumgarten syndrome associated with portal vein thrombosis that developed, slowly during a 2-year period after, endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy. The thrombosis led to the disappearance of the venous hum and the dilated abdominal wall veins characteristic of this syndrome. A 73-year-old woman was hospitalized for treatment of esophageal varices in April 1988. Her spleen was markedly enlarged, and the histologic findings of her liver were not consistent with hepatic cirrhosis, but with idiopathic portal hypertension. A venous hum was audible in the upper abdomen. Superior mesenteric angiography revealed a porto-systemic shunt vessel under the abdominal wall, originating from the umbilical vein. She was injected four times with a sclerosant, and this brought about disappearance of the esophageal varices. Two years after the first admission, the venous hum was no longer audible, but there was a recurrence of the esophageal varices. More than 2 years later (4 years after the first admission), ultrasonographic study, computed tomography, and angiography showed a large thrombus, which completely obstructed the portal vein at the origin of the umbilical vein, and the development of collateral vessels, seen as a “cavernous transformation”.

Key words

portal vein thrombus endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Osamu Yamakawa
    • 1
  • Hideki Ohta
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Watanabe
    • 1
  • Yoshiharu Motoo
    • 1
  • Takashi Okai
    • 1
  • Masumi Kadoya
    • 2
  • Osamu Matsui
    • 2
  • Norio Sawabu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Cancer Research InstituteKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologySchool of MedicineKanazawaJapan

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