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Ecological Research

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 185–193 | Cite as

The ecology of a beech forest on Mt. Sanpoiwadake, Hakusan National Park, Japan II. The correlation of the subassociation within the Lindero membranaceae-fagetum crenatae association and environmental parameters

  • Tukasa Hukusima
  • Kennth Andrew Kershaw
Article

Abstract

Detailed examination of a sample plot covered by the Lindero membranaceae-Fagetum crenatae association on Mt. Sanpoiwadake, Hakusan National Park, revealed a number of correlations between the distribution of subassociations and environmental factors.

The subassociations on the south-facing slopes receive deep snow cover in winter with rapid melting in the spring. They occur on porous, freely draining soils, typical of the general range of brown forest soils. Conversely, on the north-eastern slopes there are widespread late-snow patches which delay leaf development and expansion and which provide an abundant water supply well into early summer. Under these conditions, bleached soil horizons have developed with iron pan formation, resulting in poor soil drainage, strongly correlated with quite different plant communities.

Key words

DCA Leaf expansion Snow deposition Soil type Subassociation of Lindero membranaceae-Fagetum crenatae 

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References

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Copyright information

© Ecological Society of Japan 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tukasa Hukusima
    • 1
  • Kennth Andrew Kershaw
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchu, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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