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Journal of Forest Research

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 31–37 | Cite as

Tree size dependence of litter production, and above-ground net production in a young Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) stand

  • Stephen Adu-Bredu
  • Taketo Yokota
  • Kazuharu Ogawa
  • Akio Hagihara
Original Articles

Abstract

The study was carried out in a 9-year-old hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa (Sieb. et Zucc.) Endl.), stand over a span of three years from July 1992 to June 1995, primarily to predict litter production from exteral tree dimensions by combining open-top clothtrap and clipping methods. Litter production was virtually concentrated in October and November. Stem cross-sectional area at the crown base was proved to be the reliable predictor of litter production, and that single regression model was evolved irrespective of year. The regression model had proportional constants of 2.696 × 10−2 and 3.540 × 10−2 kg cm−2 year−1 for leaf litter and total litter production, respectively. Utilizing the model, leaf litter production of the stand was assessed to be 5.04, 5.12, and 4.99, and total litter production to be 6.48, 6.58, and 6.40 Mg ha−1 year−1 for the first, second and third year, respectively. Biomass increment was 6.67, 7.80, and 7.70, tree mortality was 0.15, 0.13, and 0.41, and insect grazing was 0.09, 0.05, and 0.002 Mg ha−1 year−1 for the first, second and third year, respectively. Above-groud net production was therefore 13.39, 14.55, and 14.51, Mg ha−1 year−1, and biomass accumulation ratio (biomass/net production) was 1.86, 2.21, and 2.76 year for the first, second and third year, respectively. Considering data from earlier studies and the results of this study, biomass accumulation ratio,BAR (year), of hinoki stands was best related to above-ground biomass,y (Mg ha−1), using the power function:BAR=0.112y0.936. Excluding seedling stands, leaf efficiency (above-ground net production per unit leaf mass) of hinoki stands was 0.91±0.02 (SE) Mg Mg−1 year−1, irrespective of stand biomass or age.

Key words

attached dead matter biomass accumulation ratio leaf efficiency litter-fall stem cross-sectional area at the crown base 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Forestry Society 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Adu-Bredu
    • 1
  • Taketo Yokota
    • 1
  • Kazuharu Ogawa
    • 1
  • Akio Hagihara
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest Ecology and Physiology Laboratory, Forest Sciences Division, School of Agricultural SciencesNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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