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Journal of Forest Research

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 189–192 | Cite as

Chemical modification of rain water byAlnus japonica wetland forest in Kiritapp mire, eastern Hokkaido, Japan

  • Hideo Tomizawa
  • Masae Oikawa
  • Fumihiko Nishio
  • Akira Haraguchi
Short Communication

Abstract

A survey was made of seasonal changes in pH and electronic conductivity (EC) of precipitation inAlnus japonica (Thunb.) Steud. forest in Kiritapp mire, Hokkaido, Japan. The average pH of throughfall and stem flow was higher than that of bulk deposition. When the pH of bulk deposition exceeded 5.5, however, pH of throughfall and stem flow was lower than that of bulk deposition. The EC of stem flow was always higher than throughfall, and that of throughfall higher than that of bulk deposition. The EC of stem flow was highest during the first defoliation period ofA. japonica. On the other hand, the differences in the EC of throughfall and bulk deposition was very few just after the first defoliation period ofA. japonica. This implies that the chemical properties of throughfall and stem flow are strongly affected by the phenology of the plants.

Key words

acid rain Alnus japonica chemical modification 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Forestry Society 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideo Tomizawa
    • 1
  • Masae Oikawa
    • 2
  • Fumihiko Nishio
    • 2
  • Akira Haraguchi
    • 3
  1. 1.Kiritapp Mire Research CenterHamanakaJapan
  2. 2.Hokkaido University of Education Kushiro CollegeKushiroJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of AgricultureHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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