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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 261–269 | Cite as

Use of a multiple addition bioassay to determine limiting nutrients in eagle lake, California

  • Paul E. Maslin
  • Gerald L. Boles
Article

Abstract

This investigation uses anin vitro enrichment bioassay (in which all essential nutrients except one are added to each culture) to determine which nutrients are important to algal growth in Eagle Lake. The technique was developed when it was discovered that addition of individual nutrients produced little if any growth response. Laboratory bioassays correlated well with comparative studies in the lake.

A great deal of variation was found throughout the year but P, N, Fe, and S were found to be limiting at one time or another. The north and south basins of the lake, which differ in morphometry, were also found to differ in the intensity spectrum of limitation. While P was the most important nutrient in both basins, the other nutrients were more limiting in the north basin than the south, and Fe, which was least limiting in the south, was very important in the north. The multiple enrichment bioassay has several advantages over other bioassays.

Keywords

Bioassay nutrients algal growth 

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk b. v. publishers 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul E. Maslin
    • 1
  • Gerald L. Boles
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesCalifornia State UniversityChico
  2. 2.California Department of Water ResourcesRed Bluff

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