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Journal of Plant Research

, Volume 107, Issue 3, pp 299–305 | Cite as

Amino acid sequences of ferredoxin isoproteins from Japanese taro (Colocasia esculenta Schott)

  • Harumi Sakai
  • Kaeko Kamide
  • Susumu Morigasaki
  • Yukika Sanada
  • Keishiro Wada
  • Masaaki Ihara
Original Articles

Abstract

The amino acid sequences of ferredoxins (Fd A and Fd B) from Japanese taro (Colocasia esculenta Schott) were determined. They consisted of single polypeptide chains of 98 residues, and both Fds had molecular masses of 10700 and 10500, respectively. There was a 92% homology between the sequences of the isoproteins (Fd A and Fd B). These sequences were compared with those of the closely related plant Fds and their phylogenetic tree was constructed. Two ferredoxin isoproteins from Hawaiian taro (Colocasia esculenta Schott) were also isolated and their N-terminal sequences were determined to be identical to those of Japanese taro.

Key words

Alocasia macrorrhiza Schott Amino acid sequence Colocasia esculenta Schott Ferredoxins Taro 

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Japan 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harumi Sakai
    • 1
  • Kaeko Kamide
    • 1
  • Susumu Morigasaki
    • 1
  • Yukika Sanada
    • 1
  • Keishiro Wada
    • 1
  • Masaaki Ihara
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Faculty of ScienceKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Chiba Schooling CentreUniversity of AirChibaJapan

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