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Plant and Soil

, Volume 116, Issue 1, pp 129–131 | Cite as

Partitioning of biologically fixed nitrogen in cowpea during pod development

  • L. A. Douglas
  • R. W. Weaver
Short Communications

Abstract

Two days after exposure of roots to15N labeled N2, partitioning of biologically fixed N into leaves, stems, peduncles, pods, roots and nodules was measured in the early pod development stage of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.). The experimental objective was to determine the quantity of biologically fixed N that is incorporated into vegetative tissue before being mobilized to pods. For the three varieties of cowpea included in the experiment a maximum of 50% of the N, biologically fixed two days earlier, was contained in the pods. The remaining N was distributed throughout the vegetative portion of the plant with at least 30% in stems and leaves which indicates that much of the newly fixed N must cycle through a N pool in these tissues before reaching the pods.

Key words

15nitrogen fixation nitrogen partitioning translocationVigna unguiculata 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Douglas
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. W. Weaver
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Agric. and ForestryUniv. MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  2. 2.Soil and Crop Sciences Dept., The Texas Agric. Expt. StationTexas A&M Univ.College StationUSA

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