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Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 3, Issue 6, pp 140–147 | Cite as

Birefringent-coating analysis of laterally loaded perforated plates

The distribution of principal stresses and the deflections across the ligaments of thick perforated circular plates subjected to uniform lateral loading while simply supported were experimentally determined
  • D. J. Bynum
  • M. M. Lemcoe
Article
  • 65 Downloads

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to obtain experimental stress and deflection data for thick, circular, simply supported plates, containing circular transverse perforations in square motif, under uniform lateral loading. The stress-concentration factor and the deflection-multiplier factor, the ratio of the maximum principal stress and the maximum deflection of the perforated plate to that of the solid-plate specimen, respectively, were obtained for each perforated specimen. These factors can be conveniently used for the design of tube sheets, perforated heads, or other similar structural components.

Keywords

Mechanical Engineer Fluid Dynamics Perforation Principal Stress Structural Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

a

specimen radius, measured from specimen center to center of bolt holes, in

Cb

plastic-reinforcement correction factor for flexural loading

D

diameter, in

DMF

deflection-multiplier factor, ratio of maximum deflection of perforated plate to maximum deflection of solid plate, using solid-plate test data

d

compensator constant, div/tint of passage

Es

Young's modulus of specimen, psi

e

strain, μin./in

H

specimen thickness, in

K

strain-sensitivity constant, fringe/(μin./in.) (in.)

Na,N0

slope of normal and oblique incidence readings, respectively, from plot of compensator reading vs. uniform lateral load, div/psi

P

specimen perforation pitch, in

q

uniform lateral pressure, psi

r

radius, in

S

ligament width, in

SCF

stress-concentration factor, ratio of maximum principal stress in perforated plate to maximum principal stress in solid plate, using solidplate test data

tc

birefringent-coating thickness on specimen, in

ω

deflection, in

X

distance from boundary of hole nearest specimen center, measured along ligament centerline, in

α

coefficient of linear thermal expansion, μin./in. −°F

β

direction of\(\sigma _1\), with orientation as shown in Fig. 4, deg

λ

wave length of light source, in

\(\mu _s\)

Poisson's ratio of specimen

\(\sigma _1 , \sigma _2 , \sigma _b\)

maximum and minimum principal stresses, and stress at a boundary, respectively, psi

θ

angular orientation of a specimen diameter as shown in Fig. 4, deg

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Bynum
    • 1
  • M. M. Lemcoe
  1. 1.Department of Structural ResearchSouthwest Research InstituteSan Antonio 6

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